Instruments

SCREEN for CHILD ANXIETY RELATED DISORDERS (SCARED)

The SCARED is a child and parent self-report instrument used to screen for childhood anxiety disorders including general anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder and social phobia. In addition, it assesses symptoms related to school phobia. The SCARED consists of 41 items and 5 factors that parallel the DSM-IV classification of anxiety disorders. The child and parent versions of the SCARED have moderate parent-child agreement and good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and discriminant validity, and it is sensitive to treatment response.  Birmaher, B., Brent, D. A., Chiappetta, L., Bridge, J., Monga, S., & Baugher, M. (1999). Psychometric properties of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED): A replication study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 38(10), 1230–6.

Target population: Children ages 8-18 years

Intended users: Clinicians and Psychiatrists

Time to Administer: 10 minutes

Completed by: Children and Parents

For more information, please call Dr. Birmaher at (412) 246-5235 or via Email.

Pen and paper versions with scoring directions attached

Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent about Child Version
Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCAARED) Adult Version

Automated scoring for PCs

Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent aboutChild Version
Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCAARED) Adult Version

Automated scoring for MACs

Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent aboutChild Version
Screen for Child and Anxiety Related Disorders (SCAARED) Adult Version

Translations

Arabic Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Arabic Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent about Child Version
Chinese Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED)
French Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED)
German Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Italian Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED)
Tamil Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) (Sri Lanka)
Thai Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Thai Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent about Child Version
Spanish (Colombia) Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Spanish (Colombia) Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent about Child Version
Czech Screen for Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Czech Screen for Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent about Child Version
Finnish Screen for Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Child Version
Finnish Screen for Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED) Parent about Child Version

 

K-SADS MANIA RATING SCALE

This rating scale is based on the items from the WASH-U-KSADS (Barbara Geller, M.D.) and the 4th Revision of the KSADS-P (Joaquim Puig-Antich, M.D. and Neal Ryan, M.D.). The following items are to determine the presence of mania or hypomania during a period of time prescribed by the rater/
study. At the end of the scale, the rater should note the onset and offset of the time period being rated. If any of the items are judged present, inquire in a general way to determine how s/he was behaving at the time with such questions as, "When you were this way, what kind of things were you doing? How did you spend your time?" If there have been manic periods it is exceedingly important that they are clearly delineated. Whenever two or more items are scored positively, it is important to determine if they occurred at the same time.

K-SADS Mania Rating Scale
A Comparative Scoring Guide Cut-Offs of Positive Symptomatology

 

K-SADS PL DSM-5 (November 2016)

Permitted Usage
Usage is freely permitted without further permission for uses that meet one or more of the following: 

  • Clinical usage in a not-for-profit institution 
  • Usage in an IRB approved research protocol 

All other uses require written permission of the principal author, Dr. David Axelson, including but not limited to the following: 

  • Redistribution of the instrument in printed, electronic or other forms 
  • Commercial use of the instrument 
  • Modification of the instrument 


For more information regarding KSADS Training

KSADS-PL DSM 5 Screen Interview
Supplement #1 Depressive and Bipolar Related Disorders
Supplement #2 Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
Supplement #3 Anxiety, Obsessive Compulsive, and Trauma-Related Disorders
Supplement #4 Neurodevelopmental, Disruptive, and Conduct Disorders
Supplement #5 Eating Disorders and Substance-Related Disorders
Summary Diagnostic Checklists

 

MOOD ENERGY THEMOMETER

Mood & Energy Thermometer: This is an improved and practical way of monitoring complex mood cycles and daily schedule. Given that some clinicians and patients may get confused about different 1 to 10 scales (e.g., a 10 could mean extreme depression or extreme mania or no depression), we considered to improve the language in communicating (and monitoring) mood. Moreover, many children report their energy levels more accurately than their mood and therefore, we incorporated energy levels in the mood rating. The Mood and Energy Thermometer that we developed at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic (WPIC) (and have used in about 400 kids) rates mania and increased energy on a 1 to 10 scale and rates depression and tiredness on -1 to -10 scale and attempts to form a common language between patients, families, and clinicians. This scale also takes into account time spent in depression and/mania such as -4 would mean “mild depression” and “mild tiredness” present in ≥50% of the time and -3 would mean “mild depression” and “mild tiredness” present in < 50% of the time. Our inclusion of measuring energy levels is consistent with the DSM 5, because energy level is now in DSM 5 as a main mood symptom criterion. Bipolar track patients (whether they have mania or depression, or mixed features) are rating their mood and energy levels every day on this scale and our master’s degree clinician meet with them on daily basis to help them better identify and record their mood symptoms, which has significant clinical value for not only treatment but also prevent a future episode.

Mood and Energy Thermometer
Mood and Energy Thermometer with Anger and Anxiety (with recording/monitoring card)
Mood and Energy Thermometer with Anger and Anxiety - Simplified Version